Early Childhood Education and Care

Assessment Workbook 6

Certificate III in

Early Childhood Education and Care

Subject 6

Culture and Community

Version 5.2 Produced 9 February 2018

Copyright © 2016 Compliant Learning Resources. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system other than pursuant to the terms of the Copyright Act 1968 (Commonwealth), without the prior written permission of
Compliant Learning Resources.

Version control & document history

Date Summary of modifications made Version
27 November 2013 Version 1 final produced following assessment validation 1.0
19 November 2014 Version 2 final produced following assessment validation 2.0
2 February 2015 Version 3 final produced following assessment validation 3.0
5 July 2016 Version 4 final produced following assessment validation 4.0
2 September 2016 Converted workbook to Inspire cobranded version. 5.0
10 March 2017 Updated link for Guide for engaging respectfully with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People – Project 1 Step 3 5.1
9 February 2018 Updated Knowledge Question 6c 5.2

Table of Contents

This is an interactive table of contents. If you are viewing this document in Acrobat, clicking on a heading will transfer you to that page. If you have this document open in Word, you will need to hold down the Control key while clicking for this to work.

Instructions 4

What is competency based assessment? 5

The Basic Principles of Assessing Nationally Recognised Training 6

The Dimensions of Competency 7

reasonable Adjustment 8

Cheating and Plagiarism 10

The Units of Competency 11

Context for Assessment 17

Assessment Methods 18

Resources required for assessment 18

Presentation 19

Assessment Workbook Coversheet 20

Knowledge Assessment 21

Projects 30

Project 1 30

Project 2 43

Workbook Checklist 47

Feedback 48

Instructions

The questions in this workbook are divided into two categories.

The written questions cover underpinning knowledge of the Learner Guide 6 Culture and Community content and concepts. These questions are all in a short answer format. You must answer all questions using your own words. However you may reference your learner guide, and other online or hard copy resources to complete this assessment.

If you are currently working as part of an Early Childhood Education/Child Care team, you may answer these questions based on your own workplace. Otherwise consider what you should do if you were working as part of an Early Childhood Education/Child Care team.

The project includes a simulated scenario which covers required areas not likely to be encountered in Vocational Placement.

You need to read and respond to this scenario by presenting a report that covers a series of specified points.

What is competency based assessment?

The features of a competency based assessment system are:

  • It is focused on what learners can do and whether it meets the criteria specified by industry as competency standards.
  • Assessment should mirror the environment the learner will encounter in the workplace.
  • Assessment criteria should be clearly stated to the learner at the beginning of the learning process.
  • Assessment should be holistic. That is it aims to assess as many elements and/or units of competency as is feasible at one time.
  • In competency assessment a learner receives one of only two outcomes – competent or not yet competent.
  • The basis of assessment is in applying knowledge for some purpose. In a competency system, knowledge for the sake of knowledge is seen to be ineffectual unless it assists a person to perform a task to the level required in the workplace.
  • The emphasis in assessment is on assessable outcomes that are clearly stated for the trainer and learner. Assessable outcomes are tied to the relevant industry competency standards where these exist. Where such competencies do not exist, the outcomes are based upon those identified in a training needs analysis.

Definition of Competency

Assessment in this context can be defined as:

  • The fair, valid, reliable, and flexible gathering and recording of evidence to support judgement on whether competence has been achieved. Skills and knowledge (developed either in a structured learning situation, at work, or in some other context) are assessed against national standards of competence required by industry, rather than compared with the skills and knowledge of other learners.

The Basic Principles of Assessing Nationally Recognised Training

Developing and conducing assessment, in an Australian vocational education and training context, is founded on a number of basic conventions:

The Principles of Assessment

  • Assessment must be valid
    • Assessment must include the full range of skills and knowledge needed to demonstrate competency.
    • Assessment must include the combination of knowledge and skills with their practical application.
    • Assessment, where possible, must include judgements based on evidence drawn from a number of occasions and across a number of contexts.
  • Assessment must be reliable
    • Assessment must be reliable and must be regularly reviewed to ensure that assessors are making decisions in a consistent manner.
    • Assessors must be trained in national competency standards for assessors to ensure reliability.
  • Assessment must be flexible
    • Assessment, where possible, must cover both the on and off-the-job components of training within a course.
    • Assessment must provide for the recognition of knowledge, skills and attitudes regardless of how they have been acquired.
    • Assessment must be made accessible to learners though a variety of delivery modes, so they can proceed through modularised training packages to gain competencies.
  • Assessment must be fair and equitable
    • Assessment must be equitable to all groups of learners.
    • Assessment procedures and criteria must be made clear to all learners before assessment.
    • Assessment must be mutually developed and agreed upon between assessor and the assessed.
    • Assessment must be able to be challenged. Appropriate mechanisms must be made for reassessment as a result of challenge.

The rules of evidence (from Training in Australia by M Tovey, D Lawlor)

When collecting evidence there are certain rules that apply to that evidence. All evidence must be valid, sufficient, authentic and current;

  • Valid
    • Evidence gathered should meet the requirements of the unit of competency. This evidence should match or at least reflect the type of performance that is to be assessed, whether it covers knowledge, skills or attitudes.
  • Sufficient
    • This rule relates to the amount of evidence gathered It is imperative that enough evidence is gathered to satisfy the requirements that the learner is competent across all aspects of the unit of competency.
  • Authentic
    • When evidence is gathered the assessor must be satisfied that evidence is the learner’s own work.
  • Current
    • This relates to the recency of the evidence and whether the evidence relates to current abilities.

The Dimensions of Competency

The national concept of competency includes all aspects of work performance, and not only narrow task skills. The four dimensions of competency are:

  • Task skills
  • Task management skills
  • Contingency management skills
  • Job role and environment skills

Reasonable Adjustment

Adapted Reasonable Adjustment in teaching, learning and assessment for learners with a disability – November 2010 – Prepared by – Queensland VET Development Centre

Reasonable adjustment in VET is the term applied to modifying the learning environment or making changes to the training delivered to assist a learner with a disability. A reasonable adjustment can be as simple as changing classrooms to be closer to amenities, or installing a particular type of software on a computer for a person with vision impairment.

Why make a reasonable adjustment?

We make reasonable adjustments in VET to make sure that learners with a disability have:

  • the same learning opportunities as learners without a disability
  • the same opportunity to perform and complete assessments as those without a disability.

Reasonable adjustment applied to participation in teaching, learning and assessment activities can include:

  • customising resources and assessment activities within the training package or accredited course
  • modifying the presentation medium learner support
  • use of assistive / adaptive technologies
  • making information accessible both prior to enrolment and during the course
  • monitoring the adjustments to ensure learner needs continue to be met.

Assistive / Adaptive Technologies

Assistive/adaptive technology means ‘software or hardware that has been specifically designed to assist people with disabilities in carrying out daily activities’ (World Wide Web Consortium – W3C). It includes screen readers, magnifiers, voice recognition software, alternative keyboards, devices for grasping, visual alert systems, digital note takers.

IMPORTANT NOTE

Reasonable adjustment made for collecting candidate assessment evidence must not impact on the standard expected by the workplace, as expressed by the relevant Unit(s) of Competency. E.g. If the assessment was gathering evidence of the candidates competency in writing, allowing the candidate to complete the assessment verbally would not be a valid assessment method. The method of assessment used by any reasonable adjustment must still meet the competency requirements.

Cheating and Plagiarism

What is Cheating?

Cheating within the context of the study environment means to dishonestly present an assessment task or assessment activity as genuinely representing your own understanding of and/or ability in the subject concerned.

Some examples of cheating are:

  • Submitting someone else’s work as your own. Whether you have that persons consent or not.
  • Submitting another author’s work as your own, without proper acknowledgement of the author.
  • To allow someone else to submit your own work as theirs.
  • To use any part of someone else’s work without the proper acknowledgement

There are other forms of cheating not contained in this list. These are merely given as some examples. If you are unsure about whether any particular behaviour would constitute plagiarism or cheating, check with your trainer prior to submitting your assessment work.

What is Plagiarism?

Plagiarism is a form of cheating and includes presenting another person or organisation’s ideas or expressions as your own. This includes, however is not limited to: copying written works such as books or journals, data or images, tables, diagrams, designs, plans, photographs, film, music, formulae, web sites and computer programs.

How do I avoid Plagiarism or Cheating?

Students are advised to note the following advice to avoid claims of plagiarism or cheating:

  • Always reference other people’s work. You may quote from someone else’s work (for example from websites, textbooks, journals or other published materials) but you must always indicate the author and source of the material.
  • Always reference your sources. You should name sources for any graphs, tables or specific data, which you include in your assignment.
  • You must not copy someone else’s work and present it as your own.
  • You must not falsify assessment evidence.

The Units of Competency

Each unit of competency can be unbundled to reveal two key assessment components:

  1. the performance criteria
  • specifying the required level of performance
  1. the evidence guide
  • Describing the underpinning knowledge and skills that must be demonstrated to determine competence. It provides essential advice for assessment of the unit of competency in the form of:
    • critical aspects of evidence
    • the essential skills
    • the essential knowledge

An outline of the units of competency is included below. Note that some skills that are not able to be observed in the workplace during your Vocational Placement will be assessed utilising Case Studies and/or projects.

CHCDIV001 Work with diverse people

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to work respectfully with people from diverse social and cultural groups and situations, including Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

  1. Reflect on own perspectives
  2. Appreciate diversity and inclusiveness, and their benefits
  3. Communicate with people from diverse backgrounds and situations
  4. Promote understanding across diverse groups

Performance Evidence

The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be evidence that the candidate has:

  • undertaken a structured process to reflect on own perspectives on diversity
  • recognised and respected the needs of people from diverse social and cultural backgrounds in at least 3 different situations:
    • selected and used appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication
    • recognised situations where misunderstandings may arise from diversity and formed appropriate responses

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. This includes knowledge of:

  • concepts of cultural awareness, cultural safety and cultural competence and how these impact different work roles
  • concepts and definitions of diversity
  • own culture and the community attitudes, language, policies and structures of that culture and how they impact on different people and groups
  • features of diversity in Australia and how this impacts different areas of work and life:
    • political
    • social
    • economic
    • cultural
  • legal and ethical considerations (international, national, state/territory, local) for working with diversity, how these impact individual workers, and the consequences of breaches:
    • discrimination:
      • age
      • disability
      • racial
      • sex
    • human rights:
      • Universal declaration of human rights
      • relationship between human needs and human rights
      • frameworks, approaches and instruments used in the workplace
    • rights and responsibilities of workers, employers and clients, including appropriate action when rights are being infringed or responsibilities not being carried out
  • key areas of diversity and their characteristics, including:
    • culture, race, ethnicity
    • disability
    • religious or spiritual beliefs
    • gender, including transgender
    • intersex
    • generational
    • sexual orientation/sexual identity – lesbian, gay, bisexual, heterosexual
  • key aspects, and the diversity, of Australia’s Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultures, including:
    • social, political and economic issues affecting Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people
    • own culture, western systems and structures and how these impact on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and their engagement with services
  • potential needs of marginalised groups, including:
    • protective factors
    • physical, mental and emotional health issues/care needs
    • consideration of impacts of discrimination, trauma, exclusion and negative attitudes
  • resources that support individuals and organisations to embrace and respond to diversity
    • language and cultural interpreters
    • imagery
  • influences and changing practices in Australia and their impact on the diverse communities that make up Australian society
  • impact of diversity practices and experiences on personal behaviour, interpersonal relationships, perception and social expectations of others

CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety

The unit describes the skills and knowledge required to identify Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety issues in the workplace, model cultural safety in own work practice, and develop strategies to enhance cultural safety.

  1. Identify cultural safety issues in the workplace
  2. Model cultural safety in own work
  3. Develop strategies for improved cultural safety
  4. Evaluate cultural safety strategies

Performance Evidence

The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be evidence that the candidate has:

  • promoted Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety in the context of at least 1 workplace
  • researched culture and history, the impact of European settlement, loss of land and culture and the importance of law and kinship
  • evaluated ways to improve communication with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples who may be clients or colleagues.

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. This includes knowledge of:

  • concept of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety in the community services and health context, and its relationship with:
    • cultural awareness
    • cultural competence
  • legislative context for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety
  • the diversity of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultures
  • historical, social, political and economic issues affecting Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and their engagement with community services and health systems, including:
    • impact of European settlement
    • loss of land and culture
    • racism and discrimination
    • past and present power relations
  • own culture, western systems and structures and how these impact on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and their engagement with services
  • factors that contribute to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander ill health and common diseases experienced by these groups of people:
    • impact of trauma on individuals’ ability for:
      • decision-making
      • communicating
      • understanding
      • retaining information
  • ways to involve Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people in the planning and delivery of services and programs

CHCECE001 Develop cultural competence

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to work towards cultural competency and to support participation of all children and families in children’s services. This support includes contributing to children’s understanding and acceptance of all cultures.

  1. Reflect on own cultural identity and biases
  2. Identify and develop cultural competency
  3. Research Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities
  4. Support individual cultural identities
  5. Create environments to support children’s cross-cultural understanding and relationships
  6. Support the implementation of inclusive learning experiences
  7. Support children in developing confidence and strength in personal and cultural identity

Performance Evidence

The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role. There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks at least once:

  • reflected on own cultural identity and biases
  • investigated cultural diversity in at least one service and community
  • supported children’s and families’ cross-cultural relationships through the following activities:
    • interacting in culturally appropriate ways with children, families and communities
    • consulting with appropriate persons to access local knowledge of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander culture
    • planning and implementing supportive environments for all children
    • supporting the implementation of experiences that encourage children to respect all cultures and to celebrate cultural differences
    • embedding examples of diversity and inclusion in daily practice
    • using effective oral communication techniques to liaise between differing cultural contexts and situations.

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively do the task outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage the task and manage contingencies in the context of the identified work role.

This includes knowledge of:

  • how to access:
    • the National Quality Framework
    • the National Quality Standards
    • the relevant approved learning framework
  • how to navigate through framework and standards documents to find areas relevant to this unit of competency
  • cultural competence and diversity as outlined in the approved learning framework relevant to the workplace
  • impact of colonisation, historical events and issues on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people
  • organisational policies and initiatives designed to support participation
  • organisational standards, policies and procedures.

Assessment for these units will be assessed through completion of Workbook Six (6) and Workbook Seven (7) in the section covering Culture and Community.

Context for Assessment

To complete the assessment in this workbook, students need to have access to their learning materials and the internet. The written questions and case studies may be completed wholly at the student’s home, or chosen place of study.

The projects may be completed with access to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community.

Assessment Methods

Assessment for these units will be assessed through completion of Workbook Six (6) and Workbook Seven (7) in the section covering Workplace Effectiveness.

Workbook Six will focus on two assessment methods:

  1. Written Questions – based on the required knowledge component as described in the Instructions for Assessment
  2. Projects – provide tasks designed to be completed in a practical setting, to assist completion of relevant tasks addressing underpinning skills and/or knowledge requirements.

Further Assessments:

Assessment Workbook Seven (7) Skills Workbook – participant must attend a Vocational Placement.

Resources required for assessment

To complete the assessments in this workbook, the candidates will need access to:

  • Computer with internet access and installed with MS Word, Adobe Acrobat Reader
  • At least one (1) Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community representative to act as mentor
  • Access to basic art materials, such as art paper, scissors, glue, and string

Presentation

Things to Consider:
Only submit your workbook once all activities inside are complete. Should you have any questions regarding your assessments, or not understand what is required for you to complete your assessment, please feel free to ask your trainer. Keep your answers succinct and make sure you are answering the question. Re-read the question after you have drafted up your response just to be sure you have covered all that is needed. Your final assessment result will either be competent or not yet competent.

If submitting your assessments please ensure that
All assessment tasks within the workbook have been completed
You have proof read your assessment
Answering the Questions:
If you are using Microsoft Word you will need to click in the grey area of the box to begin typing your answer.





Assessments may not be processed if the above guidelines are not adhered to. To ensure your assessment is processed as quickly as possible, please follow these instructions.

Assessment Workbook Coversheet

WORKBOOK: WORKBOOK 6
TITLE: Culture and Community
FIRST AND SURNAME:      
PHONE:      
EMAIL:      

Please read the Candidate Declaration below and if you agree to the terms of the declaration sign and date in the space provided.
By submitting this work, I declare that: I have been advised of the assessment requirements, have been made aware of my rights and responsibilities as an assessment candidate, and choose to be assessed at this time. I am aware that there is a limit to the number of submissions that I can make for each assessment and I am submitting all documents required to complete this Assessment Workbook. I have organised and named the files I am submitting according to the instructions provided and I am aware that my assessor will not assess work that cannot be clearly identified and may request the work be resubmitted according to the correct process. This work is my own and contains no material written by another person except where due reference is made. I am aware that a false declaration may lead to the withdrawal of a qualification or statement of attainment. I am aware that there is a policy of checking the validity of qualifications that I submit as evidence as well as the qualifications/evidence of parties who verify my performance or observable skills. I give my consent to contact these parties for verification purposes.
Name :      Signature:       Date:      

Knowledge Assessment

In your own words, describe the benefits of cultural diversity in the different aspects of Australian work and life. Guidance: Briefly discuss why having many individuals from different cultures is good for our society. Include in your discussion the effect of age, education, language, race, religion, etc. in these aspects. Include a short discussion of your own cultural identity.

Your own cultural identity:      
Political:      
Social:      
Economic:      
Cultural:      
Cultural Influences From the choices below, identify five (5) cultural influences and changing cultural practices that have shaped the Australia of today. From the five you have selected, choose two (2) and briefly explain how you see their influence manifest in Australia today.

Select five (5) from these choices:
Presence of Western culture in Australia
Many Australians have blue eyes
The existence of a democratic system of government
Dominance of the English language in Australia
Population growth
The presence of marsupials in Australia
Evidence of a significant Anglo-Celtic heritage
The diverse input of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
How you see this influence is manifested in Australia today:      
Legislation and Childhood Education and Care Services: Identify the piece of legislation related to discrimination against the features of diversity listed below. Discuss the impact of each piece of legislation on work and social practices in Early Childhood Education and Care services. This may be in the form of rights or responsibilities of workers, employers, or clients. Cite the one (1) consequence of breaching each of these pieces of legislation.



Relevant legislation or regulation Implications of this legislation on work and social practices Consequences of breach
Age                  
Sex                  
Race                  
Disability                  
Childcare policies, procedures, and practices: Identify two (2) nationally recognised governing systems followed by childcare centres across Australia. Provide two (2) examples of initiatives to support participation of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people within your service. Guidance: As answers may vary depending on the childcare centre policies, procedures, or practices you are using as reference, provide answers that are generally accepted across different childcare centres.


Nationally Recognised Governing Systems            

Examples of Initiatives to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people within your service:      
     
Review the Sparkling Stars Policies and Procedures. Click on this logo while pressing the Ctrl key to access the website of Sparkling Stars Early Childcare Centre: Username: learner Password: studyhard

Answer the questions that follow.

Bertana is new in your class. She is six years old and of Aboriginal descent. English is not her first language, and she has trouble participating in class because she has to remember the English equivalent of words first before saying them aloud. Identify one (1) strategy you can employ in Bertana’s case, according to the Sparkling Stars Access and Equity Policy:      
Suppose you are able to speak French with relative fluency. One of your students, Sebastien, is French. He has displayed less than desirable behaviours in your class in a number of instances. You wish to speak to his parents who do not speak English very well. Should you speak to Sebastien’s parents in French? Check either ‘yes’ or ‘no’, then identify the strategy or guideline in the Sparkling Stars Access and Equity Policy to justify your answer: Yes No      
The parents of the students of Sparkling Stars visit the centre frequently, either to pick up their children or speak to the staff regarding their child’s progress and other concerns. Does Sparkling Stars Childcare Centre have the responsibility to provide a safe environment that caters to the parents’ safety needs? Select one (1) option from below, then identify the guideline in the Sparkling Stars Child Protection Policy to justify your answer: Yes, the needs of parents must be taken into account. No, the centre only caters to the needs of children.      
Tino is consistently displaying unacceptable behaviour at the centre. He pushes other children and takes their things against their will. Refer to the Sparkling Stars policy on Guiding Children’s Behaviour. Select three (3) procedures below that are acceptable ways to deal with the child: i. Speak to Tino about his behaviour, making sure he understands the limits of what is acceptable. ii. Tell the other children to speak to the Director about the issue. iii. Speak to Tino’s parents, so they may punish him at home. iv. Speak to Tino’s parents to ensure that there is no conflict between the expectations of his behaviour at Sparkling Stars and at home. v. Design a “Behaviour Management Program” for Tino with his family.
In reference to the Sparkling Stars policy on Guiding Children’s Behaviour, what is one strategy that can help a child from a different culture understand what acceptable behaviour is in the centre? Select one (1). i. Comparing the child to other children ii. Role modelling acceptable behaviour iii. Lecturing the child and his parents iv. Isolating the child until his behaviour changes
Access the National Quality Framework (NQF), the National Quality Standards (NQS), and the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF), and answer the following questions:

The NQF and NQS are relatively long documents. Select two (2) ways you can easily navigate through these resources to find relevant content easily. i. Call a friend ii. Look through the table of contents iii. Use the ‘search’ function (for digital copies) iv. Refer to other texts v. Regulation 167
Cite one (1) website where you can access each of the following: You may repeat your answers. NQF       NQS       EYLF      
Review Chapter 6: Cultural Competence of the Educators’ Guide to the EYLF. Fill in the blanks:       building is fundamental to cultural competence and is based on the foundations of understanding each other’s       and      , and subsequently building on the       of each other’s knowledge, using a wide range of community members and resources to build on their      . The five       and the       are critical to the development of cultural competence. “      can be defined as ‘what we create beyond our biology. Not given to us, but made by us’”. As culturally competent educators, we need to think deeply about how our work can support each child’s developing       and      .
Under the NQS, there are a number of sections relevant to embedding cultural competence into the workplace. For each of the elements of the NQS standards below, cite one (1) way that you can uphold this in the classroom.
S1.1, Element 1.1.2       S1.1 Element 1.1.5       S4, Element 4.2.3      

The Guide to the National Law and National Regulations describes how a centre should consider the family and cultural values, age, and physical and intellectual development and abilities of each child. Which of the National Regulations does it state are relevant to this? Select two (2). Regulation 154 Regulation 155 Regulation 163 Regulation 167 Regulation 168
The Guide to the National Law and National Regulations has a reference to Child Enrolment Records. Which of the regulations are relevant to keeping child enrolment records? Select three (3). Regulation 24 Regulation 99 Regulation 101 Regulation 102 Regulation 125 Regulation 133 Regulation 157 Regulation 160 Regulation 161 Regulation 162

True or false. On the spaces provided, write T if the given statements are true, and F if they are false.

    Children from Indigenous families who are being taken away “for their own good” suffer negative effects in the long term.
    Diversity is present only when people of different races and ethnicities are involved.
    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families may resist participation in Early Childhood Education and Care settings because they want to protect both themselves and their children from experiencing racism.
    Low expectations of Aboriginal children in schools may come about as the result of stereotyping and racism from early childhood workers.
    English is not the first language of many Aboriginal children, so retaining information taught in the classroom may be difficult.
    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people cannot be included in the national census unless they have homes with land titles.
    Some Aboriginal families may not want to use services that are seen as catering to families from lower socio-economic groups because they do not want their own family to be identified with this group.
    Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families are reluctant to trust and deal with mainstream services, particularly those services connected with child welfare agencies, because of the connection to the history of the Stolen Generations.
    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families are no longer reluctant to trust and deal with mainstream services, particularly those services connected with child welfare agencies, because of the connection to the history of the Stolen Generations.
    Forcing children from Indigenous families to learn English is justified because they are now able to express themselves freely at school.
    The definition of diversity includes people of different cultural backgrounds, even if they are from the same race or ethnicity.

Projects

Project 1

Addressing the Cultural Needs of Aboriginal Families

In the last few months, the Sparkling Stars Childcare Centre has identified numerous young Aboriginal families that have moved into the area, and approached the centre to provide early childhood education services. Unfortunately, they have not returned to accept the offer of a place.
An investigation by management has determined that these families do not consider your centre to be culturally appropriate from an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander perspective.   You have been given the task of investigating your local Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community to identify strategies that will better meet the cultural needs of these families and the broader Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community.
To achieve a satisfactory result in this project, you will need to follow the steps below. Read through Steps 1 to 8 of this project before commencing.
Step 1
Determine the culture of your local indigenous group/s to help improve the service delivery at Sparkling Stars.
Guidance: If there are no local indigenous groups in your community, you may describe the local indigenous groups from other areas through learning about them on the internet. However, make sure that you will be able to contact two (2) Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentors to be able to complete Steps 3 and 8 of this Project.

Provide a brief description of the following key aspects of cultural safety: their culture and customs:       language groups:       family structures:       art:       religion:      
Describe the children in your local indigenous group/s: (Describe the average age, their general interests, etc.)      
Step 2
Identify resources to assist you in promoting effective partnerships with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders in your community. This will include indigenous people who can provide cultural advice as well as any websites, publications, or other resources that can provide information on cultural practices, issues, and culturally appropriate communication. Identify at least two (2) from any of the following categories: indigenous people:       websites:       publications:       organisations:       others:       You may use these resources to answer the next steps in this project.
Step 3
Organise a meeting with at least one (1) Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentor who can advise you on developing strategies for integrating the local culture/s you have identified in Step 1 within the Sparkling Stars workplace.

Ensure you read this document prior to organising your meeting: Guide for Engaging respectfully with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

You will need to do the following: Prepare for your meeting. Meet with your mentor/s. Follow cultural protocols when engaging with your mentor/sEnsure you have an understanding of their culture prior to your visit.At your meeting, you need to seek advice on how you can integrate Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander culture. Identify strategies to improve participation, self-determination, and self-control by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities in the centre. See Step 5, and gather answers to the questions during your interview. Agree on three (3) outcomes you wish to achieve, against which cultural safety strategies can be measured.These outcomes must be specific, and based on the strategies you have developed. They must have quantifiable components. For example:Children from the childcare centre are familiar with at least two (2) Aboriginal stores.You may also discuss historical issues in relation to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and your current state or territory. (See Step 6.) Use verbal and non-verbal communication constructively to establish, develop and maintain effective relationships, mutual trust and confidence.


Download the form provided in the link below. On the second page of the form, write down your proposed strategies to: Increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Early Childhood service Reflect culturally safe and appropriate practice (upholding the different aspects of cultural safety, as identified in Step 1) Encourage self-determination and community control to ensure improved service delivery

Interview Confirmation Form Username: learner Password: studyhard

Guidance: Write only a short description of your proposed strategies in the form, and discuss them in detail with your mentor. Include in your discussion contingency plans for each strategy you proposed, for potential issues you might encounter during the implementation of these strategies.

After filling up the information above, print the form and have your mentor fill it out after your interview to document your successful completion of this task.

Take note that you are required to provide contact information of the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentor you will be interviewing. Make sure to inform your Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentor that an assessor might contact them to confirm completion of this task, and that you will have a second interview. (Set a schedule with them for when you and they are next available.)
Step 4
Note: It is acceptable that the strategies you mention in this step are different from your proposed strategies in Step 3, after taking into account your mentor’s input. Include contingency plans for each strategy to deal with the potential issues you might encounter during implementation. 4.1 Describe the strategies that you have developed in consultation with your Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentor to:

Increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Early Childhood service:      
Reflect culturally safe and appropriate practice:      
Encourage self-determination and community control to ensure improved service delivery:      

4.2 List down three (3) outcomes you and your mentor(s) have agreed upon, where cultural safety strategies can be measured against.      
Step 5
Identify any issues that may arise during implementation of your strategies: Guidance: Analyse the curriculum/teaching plan and the activities you plan to deliver in the classroom and how these would relate to the Indigenous children. Carefully study the curriculum in different aspects, such as content, cultural significance, delivery methods, classroom activities, etc. What issues might arise from these aspects and why? Identify at least two (2) issues.      
Identify who you would engage to get assistance on any issues that may arise as you implement your strategies while working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders: (Indicate who specifically you would contact for assistance in each category.)

5.2.1 interpreters:       5.2.2 health workers :       5.2.3 colleagues:      

Identify one (1) skill, one (1) attribute, and one (1) piece of knowledge that you may need to develop to ensure cultural competency.

Skill       Attitude       Piece of Knowledge      
Identify ways on how the rest of the community can improve communication with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples in your area.      
Step 6
6.1 Research on any historical issues (social, political, or economic) in relation to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and your current state or territory, including at regional and state levels. Identify two (2) issues – from famous cases, historical accounts, etc. – from your research: Guidance: You may include this in your interview with your Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentor in Step 3.
6.2 Reflect on contemporary impacts of the historical issues you identified, including those relating to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people. Identify two (2) instances, traditions, norms, etc. in your current state or territory that are the effect of the issues you have identified.
Historical Issue Impact                        
Step 7
7.1 Discuss any significant events in your life that affected the cultural biases you currently have about different cultures, particularly in the workplace, prior to starting this subject.      
7.2 Define two (2) aspects of your environment which influence your own cultural identity. Guidance: Aspects of environment may include community size, size of population of the same cultural or racial background, distance from nature or natural environments, community structure, etc.      
7.3 Reflect on the potential impact that your own background may have on your interactions and relationships with people from other cultures, particularly the Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders.      
7.4 Discuss how your personal views on diverse cultures have changed since taking this subject.      
Step 8
Organise a second meeting with at least one (1) Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander mentor. If you only interviewed one mentor in Step 3, interview a second mentor. If you interviewed both mentors in Step three, meet with at least one of them for this Step. This meeting must be held at least one (1) week following your previous interview. Discuss the strategies you came up with in Step 4, after your initial consultation. Have your mentor/s evaluate the strategies a second time. Revise the strategies accordingly. Print another copy of the Interview Confirmation Form and have your mentor/s answer it again. The strategies you will indicate in the form must be the revised strategies you indicated in Step 4 of this project: Interview Confirmation Form Username: learner Password: studyhard

Identify two (2) strategies to improve your communication with your indigenous mentors. Fill up the table below: Mentor(s)’ comments on how you communicated during your initial interview Ways to improve communication for the second interview            

Write down your revised strategies below, after your second interview:
Increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Early Childhood service:      
Reflect culturally safe and appropriate practice:      
Encourage self-determination and community control to ensure improved service delivery:      

Project 2

Protecting Cultural Safety For this project, you are to design a short activity for young children that includes a short story, visual aids, props, and classroom activities. Read through Steps 1 to 4 before proceeding. Note: The output of this project will be used in the unit Play and Development in the Skills Workbook.
Step 1
Write a short story for your class. The story must follow these guidelines: The story is aimed for children aged 5 to 7 years old. The story uses simple language and imagery. There are at least two major (2) characters from different cultures. One (1) of the characters must be of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage. The story must be 200 to 300 words long. The story must have a positive message that supports inclusion and multiculturalism.

Guidance: If you are having difficulty writing your own story, you may get ideas from existing Aboriginal stories and rewrite it in your own words. Some Aboriginal stories can be found here: https://www.didjshop.com/stories/
Write your short story here:      
Step 2
Make visual aids for your story. Create two (2) pictures that represent two scenes or events from your story from Step 1. Both pictures must follow these guidelines: The pictures must be consistent in detail with the story from Step 1. One of the pictures must include Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander imagery. The pictures must be simple, without too much detail. The pictures must not portray negative stereotypes of any culture. The pictures may be drawn by hand and scanned or drawn digitally. Copyrighted materials may not be used or copied, but may serve as inspiration for creating original artwork. The pictures must be saved in formats that can easily be opened in most computers, such as .jpg. Save the pictures as: “CHC30113 – Subject 6 – Project 2 – Step 2 – Picture 1” “CHC30113 – Subject 6 – Project 2 – Step 2 – Picture 2

Submit these pictures along with this answered workbook.
Step 3
Prepare five (5) short questions about the story for a class discussion. All the questions must follow these guidelines: The questions must relate to or is about the story in Step 1. The questions must encourage cultural diversity. For example, if your story is about two friends baking a pie, ask students what their favourite pies are, or if they have tasted pies from other places. Another example is to ask students the foreign word for key words in your story: “What language do you speak with your family? What is the word ‘friend’ in that language?” At least one (1) of the questions must promote Aboriginal culture. At least one (1) of the questions must promote appreciation for linguistic diversity. At least one (1) of the questions must present a hypothetical problem that would encourage children to think of ways to solve. At least one (1) of the questions must promote the cultural beliefs of your target audience. The questions must be simple enough for your target audience (5 to 6 years old), but challenging enough to make them think.

Write your questions here:                              

Workbook Checklist

When you have completed this assessment workbook, review the candidate’s assessment against the checklist below: The candidate has completed all the assessments in the workbook: Knowledge Assessment Project1 Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Project2 Step 1 Step 2 Step 3

IMPORTANT REMINDER Candidates must achieve a satisfactory result to ALL assessment tasks to be awarded COMPETENT for the units relevant to this cluster.

To award the candidate competent in the units relevant to this subject, the candidate must successfully complete all the requirements listed above according to the prescribed benchmarks.

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